Friday, June 12, 2009

Late Night Jazz Ballads

In vaguely browsing through the music I have, I came across a folder in my Jazz collection called "Late Night Jazz Ballads". It was 2:30 AM, and I couldn't see any reason not to play it. Work was a good 6 hours away, and a few soothing progressions couldn't hurt. As I lay propped on my elbow, listening to Jimmy Smith, Dexter Gordon, Ike Quebec and the likes, I had this little memory run-through of all the memorable 2:30 AMs I've had. Owing to my wallpaper being this hard-earned photo of the BITS, Pilani clocktower I'd clicked with the sun setting next to it, the run-through kicked off with memories of Oasis last year. Good times. Expectations shattered. The tones of the tenor sax were more than the perfect catalyst to provoke the memory-walk. I was left wondering why I'd never pulled out this folder before. I imagine all the effort that goes behind a jazz piece. To be technically perfect, to recognize that perfect progression to hit that perfect mood. But I guess in the end, every jazz artist just wants to soothe, just wants to sound good.

As I write this, I realize I don't like getting profound about my music. I would never write a post about any music, overflowing with superlatives, because in my music, the two letter word is the operative (Credit to NT for that very useful phrase). I don't like making an epic out of a piece, I don't like writing about it as if I know every facet of it, because I never will. A true priest will never glamourize God in his writings. A true soccer fan will never write about a particular goal in a rambling fashion. For worship brings with it respect, and when you respect something, you want to attach a humble outlook to it. I might speak more than what is good for my well-being about music, and about particular aspects of it, but when I write it down, I plainly want it to soothe. I just want it to physically light up the senses. I just want it to sound good. Just like a Late Night Jazz Ballad.

12 comments:

Ibanov, Sir Rekaf said...

I'll be needing that collection of yours next time we meet :D

Prashant Nagpal said...

While reading Atlas Shrugged, you seem to have passed The Fountainhead over entirely :)
Ayn Rand wouldn't agree. COuldn't say about myself though :)
Nice piece, well written, and I like the analogy :D

Nayantara said...

Nothing triggers reminiscing like good music and late hours do! :)
And somehow, nothing seems too bad in the rear view mirror. Just looking-back-with-a-wise-knowing-smile feeling!
Oh, and couldn't help writing about music eh? :P The number of music related drafts I have!
Nicely put anyway. Reads like music :)

charlie said...

:O. kinda disagree on the whole respect-it-so-shut-up-about-it theory. but that's just me i guess. and your blog still links to my blogger account :|.

Gunner Galactico said...

Eh?? So soccer commentators and the like whove lived and breathed the game for most of their lives and love it beyond all else who go bollocking insane about an amazing goal are what??

Gunner Galactico said...

"For worship brings with it respect, and when you respect something, you want to attach a humble outlook to it" first parts fair nuff,but then,most music fans are elitists,so... :|

JD said...

@ Sagar, I didn't mean it that way dude. All I meant was, when you've lived and breathed the game, you wouldn't want to show your knowledge off by talking irrelevant stuff. The less said, the better. And in the case of those who've breathed the game, the small that they say often makes the most sense, what say?

Gunner Galactico said...

The ones who go overboard are generally the poseurs :D
fair 'nuff,i think its all about the audience,more than anything :)

Adi said...

A true soccer fan will never write about a particular goal in a rambling fashion. How very true. Nice post.

Saniya said...

How very true and so beautiful!

Prashant Nagpal said...

A person who possesses more knowledge than another is not necessarily showing off when he (or, indeed, she) puts it out to the world. It may also be a will to share the information with people who he thinks might want to know, or just a will to discuss with like-minded souls.
There is absolutely nothing stopping a soccer fan from writing about one single goal except the unwillingness or inability of the reader to accept his opinion.

Rohan Murdeshwar said...

Nice stuff.

Could really picture you in your room at 2.30 in the morning listening to jazz.

"...and when you respect something, you want to attach a humble outlook to it." So true.